of 44 /44
21/02/2005 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006 Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

Embed Size (px)

Citation preview

Page 1: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTSAurélie LA PORTE - ILTS

Simulating The Aurora

PrésentationPrésentation

Master ILTS 2005 / 2006Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

Page 2: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

SOMMAIRESOMMAIRE

1. Présentation du texte de traduction1. Présentation du texte de traduction 2. Présentation du domaine2. Présentation du domaine 3. Arborescences (français / anglais)3. Arborescences (français / anglais) 4. Recherche documentaire4. Recherche documentaire 5. Terminologie; les fiches longues5. Terminologie; les fiches longues 6. Traduction: difficultés rencontrées6. Traduction: difficultés rencontrées 7. Passage de traduction7. Passage de traduction 8. Ce qu’il reste à faire8. Ce qu’il reste à faire

Page 3: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

Page 4: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

Title : Simulating the aurora

Authors : Gladimir V. G.Baranoski, Jon G. Rokne, Peter Shirley,Trond S.Trondsen and Rui Basto

Year of publication : 2003Edited in the Journal of Visualization and Computer Animation

Public : engineers, designers, geophysical researchers (to produce auroral images)

Source : internet (URL: http://www.phys.ucalgary.ca/~trondsen/TheAurora/)

Format : PDF

Page 5: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

To render the major visual aspects of auroral displays

Goal of the simulation : to perform realistic simulations of auroral displays, incorporating as many known auroral physics concepts and data as possible.

It presents an algorithm that simulates the processes associated with the auroral emissions in order to represent the major visual features of the auroral displays. Designers can use it to include auroral displays in the synthetic reproduction of polar scenes or in simulations of the night sky at different latitudes.

Subject of the text : the simulation of the aurora borealis.

It explains the phenomenon of the aurora and the way the aurora can be simulated for scientific purposes.

Page 6: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

THE STRUCTURE OF THE TEXT

▪ Introduction of the scientific background for the auroral phenomena

▪ Presentation of the auroral modeling approach

▪ Description of the rendering algorithm used to generate the auroral images

▪ Comparison of the images produced using a model with pictures of auroral displays

Page 7: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

Page 8: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

Définition FR : Fluorescence provoquée par l'interaction entre, d'une part, les atomes ou les molécules de la haute atmosphère et, d'autre part, les particules de haute énergie qui, venant de l'espace, pénètrent dans l'atmosphère.

Definition EN : Aurora is a luminous glow of the upper atmosphere which is caused by energetic particles that enter the atmosphere from above.

Regions where we can see the aurora : North and South poles (ex : Canada, Finland, Alaska, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Antartica, Tasmania, New Zealand)

To see aurora you need clear and dark sky. During very large auroral events, the aurora may be seen throughout the US and Europe, but these events are rare. Some auroras have been seen in Paris and its region

An aurora in Paris (06/04/2000):

Page 10: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

LEGENDE

Lien tout / partie (méronymie)

Hypéronyme / homonyme

Lien causal

Termes fiches longuesaurora

Page 11: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

PHENOMENES NATURELS ET PHYSIQUES

Phénomènes naturels Phénomènes physico-chimiques

astronomique climatique géologique marin atmosphérique électrique thermique ondulatoire

Page 12: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

NATURAL AND PHYSICAL PHENOMENA

Natural phenomena Physico-chemical phenomena

astronomical climatic geological marine atmospheric electric thermal undulating

Page 13: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

atmosphérique

optique météorologique

précipitation Circulation atmosphérique

scintillation

Arc en ciel

halo

Aurore polaire

Rayon vert

mirage

Bande d’Alexandre

Rayon crépusculaire

Aurore boréale Aurore australe

Page 14: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

atmospheric

optical meteorological

precipitation General circulation

scintillation

rainbow

halo

Polar aurora

Green flash

mirage

Alexander band

Twilight ray

Aurora Borealis Aurora Australis

Page 15: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

ATMOSPHERE

Basse atmosphère Haute atmosphère

troposphère stratosphère thermosphère mésosphère exosphère

Ionosphère (haute atmosphère ionisée)

Page 16: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

ATMOSPHERE

Lower atmosphere Upper atmosphere

troposphere stratosphere thermosphere mesosphere exosphere

Ionosphere (ionized high atmosphere)

Page 17: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

Ionosphère (haute atmosphère ionisée)

Couche inférieure

Couche intermédiaire

Couche supérieure

Région D (50-95 km)

Région E (95-130 km)

Région F1/F2 (130-400 km)

oxygène atomique

(O+)

azoteOxygène

(O2+)Oxygène

0+Hydrogène

H+

Page 18: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

Ionosphere (ionized high atmosphere)

Lower ionosphere

Middle ionosphere

Upper ionosphere

Region D (50-95 km)

Region E (95-130 km)

Region F1/F2 (130-400 km)

Atomic oxygen

(O+)

nitrogenOxygen (O2+)

Oxygen 0+

Hydrogen H+

Page 19: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

THE IONOSPHERE / L’IONOSPHERE

Page 20: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

SOLEIL

photosphère chromosphèrecouronne

hydrogène hélium

Vent solaire Plasma ionisé

Particules atomiques

électrons protons

Ions lourds Ions He2+

Page 21: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

SUN

photosphere chromospherecourona

hydrogen helium

Solar wind Ionized plasma

Atomic particles

electrons protons

Heavy ions Ions He2+

Page 22: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

NAISSANCE DES AURORES

Vent solaire

Champ magnétique terrestre

ionosphère

Particules atmosphériques gaz

Collision (excitation) AUROREphoton

frappe

traverse Intéraction (front de choc)

perturbe

émet

Ovale auroral

Collision avec un atome ou une molécule qui prend de l’énergie des particules énergétiques et le stocke

Excitation de l’atome qui peut reprendre un état non excité

Régions polaires

Lignes de champ magnétique

accélération

Page 23: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

THE BIRTH OF THE AURORA BOREALIS

Solar wind Earth’s magnetic field

ionosphere

Atmospheric particles gas

Collision (excitation) AUROREphoton

hits

travels down Interaction (bow shock)

disturbs

emits

Auroral oval

Collision with an atom or a molecule that takes some of the energy of the energetic particles and stores it

Excitation of the atom that can return to a non-excited state

Polar regions

Magnetic field lines

acceleration

Page 24: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

Phénomène auroral

Aspects physiques

morphologieSpectre auroral

Page 25: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

AURORAL PHENOMENA

Physical aspects

morphologyAuroral spectrum

Page 26: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

Rayonnement violet

Rayonnement bleu

Raie verte Vert rouge Raie rouge Série de bandes rouges

Molécules d’azote ionisées

Atomes d’oxygène excités

Molécules d’azote excitées

SPECTRE AURORAL

Page 27: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

Purple Blue Green ray Red green Red raySeries of red

bands

Ionized nitrogen molecules

Excited oxygen atoms

Excited nitrogen molecules

AURORAL SPECTRUM

Page 29: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

Structures non rayées

Formes basiquesAutres formes

voile tâche bande Aurore noire

rideau courbespirale pli

Arc pulsant

Arc homogèneBande oméga

Bande homogène

arc

Page 30: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

Non-rayed structures

Basic forms other shapes and forms

veil patch band Black aurora

curtain curlspiral fold

Pulsating arc

Homogeneous arc

Omega band

Homogeneous band

arc

Page 32: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

Structures rayées Structures mouvantes

raie Arc rayé

draperieBande rayée

couronne Vagues rapides

Crête dérivant vers

l’Ouest

Flamme de

l’aurora

Page 33: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

Rayed structures Moving structures

ray Rayed arc

draperyRayed band

coronaFast

auroral waves

Westward traveling

surge

Flaming aurora

Page 34: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

FORMES AURORALES

Aurore calme Haute activité

arc bande rideau couronne spirale

Arc homogène Arc pulsant

Arc rayé

Bande homogène

Bande rayée

Bande oméga

Page 35: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

AURORAL FORMS

Quiet aurora High-activity aurora

arc band curtain corona spiral

Homogeneous arc

Pulsating arc

Rayed arc

Homogeneous band

Rayed band

Omega band

Page 37: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

types

Calotte polaire

Aurore discrète Aurore diffuse

Arc auroral calme

spiraleBourrelet auroral

Bande oméga

Aurore de proton

Structure à petite échelle

courbe pli

Page 38: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

types

Polar cap Discrete aurora Diffuse aurora

Quiet auroral arc

spiralAuroral bulge

Omega band

Proton aurora

Smaller-scale auroral structure

curl fold

Page 39: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

RECHERCHE DOCUMENTAIRE

L’expert : Jean Lilenstein, docteur en géophysique, chercheur CNRS au laboratoire de Planétologie de Grenoble, spécialiste reconnu de la physique des relations Soleil-Terre, passionné de ciel et d’espace

Auteur de l’ouvrage Du Soleil à la Terre, de Sous les Feux du Soleil : Vers une Météorologie de l’Espace, ainsi que de nombreux articles de vulgarisation

Eventualité d’un expert canadien (Dominic Cantin, expert en aurores boréales)

Lieux de recherche : Internet, Museum d’Histoire naturelle, PBI, Cité des Sciences

Problèmes : phénomène peu connu en France, donc pas de corpus varié. Beaucoup de documentations en anglais, peu en français Beaucoup de documents didactiques car phénomène peu connu

(surtout en français) ou documents très scientifiques pas toujours faciles à comprendre

La plupart des documents trouvés provienent d’Internet, particulièrement de sites canadiens Problème de vocabulaire

Page 40: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

LES FICHES TERMINOLOGIQUES

▪ Difficultés dans le choix des termes pour le dictionnaire

▪ Difficultés pour trouver des contextes et des collocations en français pour certains termes

▪ Nombreux contextes et collocations en anglais, corpus varié

▪ Difficultés pour rédiger les définitions, surtout en français

Page 41: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

Vocabulaire varié : informatique

scientifique

mathématique

Domaine peu connu, donc peu de corpus pour la modélisation.

Tournure de certaines phrases ou expressions qui reviennent régulièrement difficiles à rendre en français

Ex : a uniformly distributed random number in the interval [0..1].

DIFFICULTES DE TRADUCTION

Page 42: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

PASSAGE DE TRADUCTION

Precipitation of Electron Beams

The electrons are randomly deflected after colliding with the atoms of the atmosphere. These deflections play an important role in the dynamic and stochastic nature of the auroral displays, and hence they are taken into account in our simulations. We consider the deflection points as emission points, and they are used to determine the spectral and intensity variations of the modeled auroral displays.

The tracking of each electron beam starts with the computation of the starting points described in the previous section. The electron beam’s velocity vector, , is defined as the overall direction of progression of the particle during its spiralling descending motion (Figure 3). The angle between the electron’s velocity vector and the geomagnetic field vector is called the pitch angle, . A ‘loss cone’ of pitch angles is bounded at an altitude h by an angle D (Figure 12a). This angle is given by an adiabatic invariant, which takes into account the ratio between the strength of at h and at an altitude of 100km (the auroral lower border).

Précipitation des faisceaux d’électrons

Les électrons subissent une déviation aléatoire après être entré en collision avec les atomes de l’atmosphère. Ces déviations jouent un rôle important dans la nature dynamique et stochastique des phénomènes auroraux. C’est pourquoi nous les prenons en compte dans nos simulations. Nous considérons que les points de déviation sont des points d’émission et nous les utilisons pour déterminer les variations d’intensité lumineuse des phénomènes auroraux modélisés.

L’alignement de chaque faisceau d’électron commence par le calcul informatisé des points de départ décrits dans le chapitre précédent. Le vecteur vitesse du faisceau d’électron,, est défini comme étant la direction principale de la progression de la particule pendant son mouvement descendant qui décrit une spirale (figure 3). L’angle entre le vecteur vitesse de l’électron et le vecteur du champ géomagnétiqueest appelé l’angle d’attaque, . Un « cône de perte » d’angles d’attaque est lié à une altitude h par un angle D (figure 12a). Cet angle est donné par un invariant adiabatique qui prend en compte le ratio entre la force deà l’altitude h et à une altitude de 100km (bordure inférieure de l’aurore).

Page 43: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

Electrons with ≤ D are in the loss cone and are precipitated (‘lost’) into the atmosphere. The boundaries of this loss cone are somewhat diffuse (D ≈ 2 – 3°), since the value of D decreases with altitude.22 The length of the path is given by a parameter L which is associated with the height chosen for the modelled auroral display. As mention earlier, it assumes typical values around 20–30km for arcs and bands, and around 70–100km for draperies.

Each path is simulated incrementally, through the vertical displacement t such that tnew = told + (dt ξ2), where ξ2 is a uniformly distributed random number in the interval [0..1]. The use of this random displacement is consistent with the spatial inhomogeneity of auroral electrons.23 The vertical threshold dt is an input parameter which depends on the initial energy of the electrons. For instance, on average an electron with 10 keV (60,000 km/s) can collide 300 times before being brought to a halt at an altitude of about 100km above the ground.4 In this case, since we assume that t Є [0..1], we could use dt = 1/300.

Des électrons avec ≤ D sont dans le cône de perte et sont précipités (« perdus ») dans l’atmosphère. Les frontières de ce cône de perte sont quelque peu diffuses (D ≈ 2 – 3°), puisque la valeur de D diminue avec l’altitude. La longueur de la trajectoire est obtenue avec un paramètre L qui est associé à la hauteur choisie pour le phénomène auroral modélisé. Comme nous l’avons mentionné plus haut, cela suppose des valeurs typiques autour de 20 à 30 km pour les arcs et les bandes, et autour de 70 à 100 km pour les draperies.

Chaque trajectoire est simulée par incrément, à travers le déplacement vertical t, si bien que tnew = told + (dt ξ2), où ξ2 est un nombre aléatoire à répartition uniforme dans l’intervalle [0..1]. L’utilisation de ce déplacement aléatoire est compatible avec l’inhomogénéité spatiale des électrons auroraux. Le seuil vertical dt est un paramètre d’entrée qui dépend de l’énergie initiale des électrons. Par exemple, en moyenne un électron avec 10 KeV (10 kiloélectron volt, soit 60 000 km/s) peut entrer en collision 300 fois avant d’être arrêté à une altitude de 100 km au-dessus du sol. Dans ce cas, puisque nous estimons que t Є [0..1], nous pourrions utiliser la formule dt = 1/300.

PASSAGE DE TRADUCTION (suite)

Page 44: 21/02/2005 Aurélie LA PORTE - ILTS Simulating The Aurora Présentation Master ILTS 2005 / 2006

21/02/200521/02/2005

CE QU’IL RESTE A FAIRE

▪ Continuer la traduction du texte

▪ Continuer à chercher du corpus sur la modélisation et la simulation par ordinateur

▪ Envoyer des définitions à l’expert

▪ Chercher plus de contextes pour les fiches terminologiques