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Paris, October 13, 2015 The Pinacothèque de Paris présents the exhibition LEONARDO DA VINCI, IL GENIO THE SECRETS OF THE CODEX ATLANTICUS UNVEILED From October 29, 2015 to January 31, 2016 Exposition en partenariat avec Marco d´Oggiono (attribuée à ; 1475-1530), Portrait de Léonard de Vinci, craie rouge sur papier, inv. F263 et Léonard de Vinci (1452-1519), Détails des feuillet 140 (plume, encre et lavis) et 1062 (plume et encre) du Codex Atlanticus, Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan © Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana - Milano / De Agostini Picture Library Conception graphique : © Serge Perraudin – / © Pinacothèque de Paris, 2015 *Le premier musée privé français

The Pinacothèque de Paris présents the exhibition€¦ · Paris, October 13, 2015 The Pinacothèque de Paris présents the exhibition LEONARDO DA VINCI, IL GENIO THE SECRETS OF

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  • Paris, October 13, 2015

    The Pinacothque de Paris prsents the exhibition

    LEONARDO DA VINCI, IL GENIOTHE SECRETS OF THE CODEX ATLANTICUS UNVEILED

    From October 29, 2015 to January 31, 2016

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  • LEONARDO DA VINCI, IL GENIO THE SECRETS OF THE CODEX ATLANTICUS UNVEILED

    Leonardo da Vincis notoriety is based mainly on a huge misunderstanding. In fact, the greatest artist of all time did not consider himself a painter, but, also, an engineer. For him, painting was only one of his numerous activities. The most famous painting in the whole world and of all times would therefore be the result of a genius with countless other talents.

    Of one thing we can be sure: Leonardo was no ordinary human being. He was a genius. Probably the absolute genius, the most accomplished that Humanity ever produced. He was according to the sources handsome, brilliant, irresistibly attractive, as well as being endowed with uncommon intellectual capacities.

    Born in 1452 in the city of Vinci, in Tuscany, from an illegitimate relationship, Leonardo was brought up by his paternal grandparents and was given no academic education. Self-taught, he carried out his apprenticeship by means of observation, in an empirical manner. In 1466, he joined the workshop of Verrocchio, in Florence, where he was trained in all the necessary techniques to become an artist as well as a polyvalent engineer. For instance, he probably also helped in the undertaking and the setting up of orbit ornamenting the summit of the Duomo of the cathedral in Florence, on which Verrochio and his assistants worked.

    In himself, he is the universal man and he illustrates the very definition of genius in the Renaissance, il Genio, he who has been touched by divine grace, unlike the Studio, the jobber, who had to apply himself at length in order to arrive at a middling or acceptable result. Leonardo was nonetheless a tireless worker, as can be gathered from the thousands of pages that he wrote throughout his entire life, as well as his determination, when he was over 30 years old, to learn Latin grammar and Euclidian mathematics. In 1482, he sent a letter to Ludovic le More, tutor of the Duke of Milan, to offer him his services. In that genuine letter of motivation, the young Leonardo set out his talents and knowledge in the military field, then in that of civil engineering, before explaining, at the bottom of the sheet in a succinct sentence: I can carry out sculpture in marble, bronze, terracotta. In painting, I can accomplish what no other, whoever he might be, can do. Aware of the precariousness of the peace settled between the various Italian states, he hierarchized his competencies according to the context, which is why painting and sculpture, peacetime activities par excellence, only appeared as a last resort.

    What makes Leonardo da Vinci a genius? He was the one who, during the Renaissance, five centuries ago, invented or imagined the machines of our modern world: the airplane, the helicopter, the submarine. He invented fearsome war weapons, the tank, the paddle boat, the modern ships hull, drawbridges, locks, air conditioning, and the hydraulic circulation systems. He also imagined, in the urban realm, the modern city with its traffic lanes for vehicles, ships, humans, domestic garbage, all that carried out on constructions with five levels. Not only was this man with multiple gifts an outstanding engineer and inventor, an architect and an urbanist, but he was also one of the organizers of parties and events among the most famous of their times. Nowadays, this man would have been simultaneously a high-tech genius, a designer of weapons, an urbanist and a renowned choreographer, a theatrical star.

    Marco dOggiono Portrait of Leonardo da Vinci

    c. 1515 Red chalk on paper317 x 237 mm

    Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan, CA f. 263

  • In 1499, the French took over the ducal city. Leonardo then co-operated with them. From that time dates his first contact with a king of France, Louis XII, thanks to the Comte de Ligny, representing his armies in Milan. That collusion with the kingdom of France was to spoil da Vincis reputation, confronted with the distrust of the patrons and of the governors of the main Italian cities. Thus, when he offered the city of Venice his help with work on the hydraulic problems of the Laguna, the merchant city shows suspicion on the ground that he may be collaborating with Mehmet II, the citys Ottoman enemy. Following the victory of Francis the Ist over the Swiss in Marignan, France once more occupied Milan. The king invited the famed engineer to join him. Leonardo then settled in the Clos Luc in the autumn 1516. He died there three years later in 1519.

    His masterly work is gathered up within a Codex, famed above all others, the CODEX ATLANTICUS. It is in fact the compiling by Pompeo Leoni, nearly a century after Leonardos death, of an important quantity of the sheets, which Leonardo filled in, day by day, in order to record in it his inventions, his ideas, his thoughts. They were mostly written in his specular handwriting, from right to left, since, as he was left-handed, it allowed him to not stain himself nor to spill the fresh ink. Some of his secrets remain enigmas, still undecipherable even today. However, historical research every year enables new discoveries and advances on Leonardo da Vincis life and work, to deepen our knowledge of this unusual character.

    Today, and for the first time in France, will be exhibited in the Pinacothque de Paris, a significant part of the Codex Atlanticus, enabling the public to discover the many facets of his work, unveiling his genuine personality, and confronting the Codex original drawings with the models of the inventions thought-up, conceived, even, at times, carried out, by da Vinci himself.

    This scientific and playful experience should enable the general public to understand this genius with a universal notoriety, but paradoxically unknown, at the very time when we shall be celebrating the fifth centenary of his coming to France; to better grasp the political part he played, his relationships with the kings and dukes he served; to better outline his links with the kingdom of France and its king FrancistheIst,

    who welcomed him like a father and who offered him a peaceful end of life in the Clos Luc in Amboise, with the title of first councillor of the King.

    I wish to express my profound thanks to Dr Alberto Rocca, guest-curator of the exhibition and to the Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana for having agreed to lend us these drawings of an inestimable value, as well as for their enthusiasm.

    My warmest gratitude goes to the Clos Luc and its director, Franois Saint-Bris, for his welcome and his collaboration on this project.

    Finally I wish to thank Karl Lagerfeld, curator in charge of the scenography for his work and his vision, as well as Detmar Westhoff and the Steidl Editions for their support.

    Finally, I wish to thank all those who made this exhibition possible and more particularly the team of the Pinacothque de Paris who did not spare their efforts, and whose remarkable work I wish to, once again, acknowledge.

    Marc Restellini

    Leonardo da VinciSection of the Tiberio of the Duomo of Milan

    c. 1487-1490 Pen, ink and tracks of black pencil on paper perforated for transfer 282 x 237 mm

    Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan,, CA f. 851r

  • Conditions of use and mandatory notices

    The enclosed reproductions are free of all reproduction rights only within the context of the promotion of the exhibition Leonardo da Vinci, the Secrets of the Codex Atlanticus Unveiled, from October 30, 2015 to January 31, 2016 at the Pinacothque de Paris.

    All reproduction on a cover or on a front page must be accompanied by a request for authorization from the Press Service of the PInacothque de Paris (KALIMA - Tygnia Saustier / [email protected]).

    The works must be represented in their entirety: any manipulation or alteration of the work is forbidden (including the interdiction of reproducing the details, the over-impressions, etc.). The complete notice of the work must be reproduced (authors name, title, date, technique of the work, name of the collector). The Photo to be mentioned for the works belonging to the Biblioteca Ambrosiana is Photo : Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milano ; for the models from the Chteau du Clos Luc, please refer to the entry of the model.

    For online Press, the size of the file is limited to 400 x 400 pixels and the resolution must not exceed 72 DPI. These conditions must be applied for Internet websites with an Online Press status.

    The visual documents for the media in HQ are available by downloading on the Internet site of the Pinacothque de Paris (www.pinacotheque.com, tab Press). For further information, please contact the press agency: [email protected]

    VISUALS AVAILABLE FOR THE MEDIA

    Leonardo da Vinci The Flight of Birdsc. 1505 Pen, ink and traces of red pencil

    217 x 281 mm Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan, CA f.185r

    Leonardo da Vinci Study in Perspectivec. 1513-1516 ? Pen, ink and touches of watercolour 145 x 188 mm Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan, CA f. 709r

    Marco dOggiono Portrait of Leonardo da Vinci

    c. 1515 Red chalk on paper317 x 237 mm

    Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan, CA f. 263

  • Leonardo da VinciBent-Beam Slings (detail)

    c. 1485-1493 Pen, ink and ink wash 392 x 280 mm Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan, CA f. 140r

    Leonardo da VinciStudies for the Royal Palace of Romorantin

    c. 1517-1518 Pen, ink and tracks of black pencil 178 x 260 mm

    Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan, CA f.583r

    Leonardo da VinciStudies for the Mechanical Flight

    c. 1485 Pen, ink and traces of red pencil 215 x 286 mm

    Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan, CA f.1058v

    Leonardo da VinciMen Overturning a Siege Ladder

    c. 1480-1482 Pen, ink and tracks of black pencil 196 x 255 mm

    Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan, CA f.139r

    Leonardo da VinciStamping Machinec. 1495 Pen, ink and black chalk 207 x 281 mm Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan, CA f.14r

  • Leonardo da VinciDrawing of an Arch for a Stage Set and Note about the Proposal to Follow Louis of Ligny to Rome and Naples

    c. 1494 Pen and ink 208 x 303 mmVeneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan , CA f. 669r

    Leonardo da VinciStudies on Physics, in Particular on Balance and Perpetual

    Motion c. 1495 Pen and ink 244 x 333 mm Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan, CA f. 062v

    Leonardo da Vinci List of the Things to Bring to Milan and Sketches of Human Heads

    c. 1482-1483 Pen, various kind of inks and tracks of black chalk 406 x 280 mm

    Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan, CA f. 888r

    Leonardo da VinciSection of the Tiberio of the Duomo of Milan

    c. 1487-1490 Pen, ink and tracks of black pencil on paper perforated for transfer 282 x 237 mm

    Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan, Ca f. 851r

  • lie Azoulay after Leonardo da Vinci Assault Tankreduced-size Historical Model xxth century Mixt Media

    Chteau du Clos Luc - Parc Lonardo da Vinci Photo : Lonard de Serre

    lie Azoulay after Leonardo da Vinci Device to overturn siege ladders

    reduced-size Historical Model xxth century Mixt MediaChteau du Clos Luc - Parc Lonardo da Vinci Photo : Olivier Pain

    After Leonardo da VinciRod Machine and Crank, worm Drive

    Life-size Historical Model xxth century Mixt MediaChteau du Clos Luc - Parc Lonardo da Vinci Photo : Lonard de Serre

  • USEFUL INFORMATION

    OPENING HOURS

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    The Pinacotheque of Paris is open daily from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. (exhibition halls closed at 6:15 pm.).Late openings Wednesdays and Fridays until 8:30 p.m. (exhibition halls closed at 8:15 p.m.). Friday 25th of December 2015and Friday 1st of January 2016, , the Pinacothque de Paris is open from 2 p.m. to 6 :30 p.m.Purchase of tickets for the exhibition at the cashiers located in Pinacothque I, 28, place of the Madeleine.The ticket office closes at 5 pm, on Wednesdays and Fridays at 7:30 pm.

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